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Five Fatigue-Fighting Nutrients for Life After Surgery

When fatigue sets in, everything in life seems to take more effort. Keeping up daily self-care or doing the things you love can seem insurmountable, and you can start to slip away from feeling like your usual self. While occasionally feeling tired be a sign of inadequate water intake or poor sleep habits, unshakeable fatigue following bariatric surgery can often arise due to nutrient deficiencies, which is why supplementation can make a huge difference in getting you back to your usual self.

To help you understand the importance of nutrition in fighting fatigue, here are the top five factors that enhance energy and vitality.

#1: Iron

Approximately 10% to 12% of patients have low iron prior to surgery, and within five years, 30% of patients develop an iron deficiency as result of eating less after bariatric surgery.1

Iron is an essential mineral that helps to carry oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Without enough oxygen, the body cannot create energy, which is one reason why you can feel fatigued. As such, current guidelines from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery recommend taking additional iron to prevent fatigue.2

#2: B Vitamins

After surgery, around one in five patients develop low levels of B vitamins including vitamin B1 and B12,3 which can lead to a range of deficiency symptoms, including fatigue. B vitamins are a collection of water-soluble nutrients involved in energy production within your body cells. Beyond B1 and B12, vitamin B2 and vitamin B3 are also important in energy production,4 whilst vitamin B6 and B12 support healthy stress management,5 which can help manage fatigue caused by stress.

#3: Multivitamin and Mineral Intake

The best way to prevent a broad range of nutrient deficiencies is by using an absorbable, daily multivitamin.

This helps to cover off essential vitamins and minerals on days where you fall short of eating the perfect balance of nutritional foods.  After bariatric surgery, powdered forms of multivitamins make it easier for the body to take in nutrients without having to break down tablets or capsules, allowing the body to use its energy in a more efficient way.

Another important thing to know is that when it comes to multi-nutrient supplements that contain more than one mineral (i.e. such as zinc and iron together) they can often compete with each other for absorption. This because the digestive tract has a limited number of ‘entrances’ where minerals can pass through. However, nutritional forms that allow mineral to pass through other entrances designed for proteins called ‘bisglycinates’ (meaning that a mineral is joined to two glycine proteins e.g. iron bisglycinate), a greater number of ‘entrances’ can be used. This ensures that the body is taking in multiple minerals at once, giving you a greater nutritional intake from supplements containing minerals attached to bisglycinate carriers.

#4: Protein

ProteinWhen it comes to bariatric surgery, protein is the most common nutrient deficiency due to reduced food intake and changes in protein digestion,6 which can cause sore and tired muscles. Supporting protein intake to prevent deficiency requires an average daily intake of between 60 g to 100 g (approximately 1.1 g/kg of goal body weight). Further, in some kinds of bariatric surgery (Biliopancreatic diversion), an additional 30% of protein intake is required to prevent deficiency.7BariNutrics™ Protein provides 20 g of protein per serve, which can be taken directly or mixed into smoothie recipes, ensuring that you’re getting enough protein on a daily basis to avoid deficiency.

#5: Vitamin D and Calcium

Both vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are common after bariatric surgery,8 which can influence energy levels. The treatment of low vitamin D has been shown to improve fatigue,9 and this may due to its effect on balancing calcium levels.10 Interestingly, low calcium intake can have far-reaching effects on energy levels, as it can influence the activity of other energy-boosting nutrients, such as magnesium.11 As such, supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is necessary to prevent a chain reaction of nutritional deficiencies that can cause fatigue.

The Bottom Line

After surgery, supplementing vitamins, minerals and protein can help restore dwindling energy levels, giving you more get-up-and-go for the things you love to do.  Speak to your doctor or qualified health Practitioner about the management of nutritional health after bariatric surgery today, to help you enjoy a brighter day tomorrow.

 

References:

  1. Lupoli R, Lembo E, Saldalamacchia G, Avola CK, Angrisani L, Capaldo B. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues. World J Diabetes. 2017 Nov 15;8(11):464-474. doi: 10.4239/wjd.v8.i11.464.
  2. Lupoli R, Lembo E, Saldalamacchia G, Avola CK, Angrisani L, Capaldo B. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues. World J Diabetes. 2017 Nov 15;8(11):464-474. doi: 10.4239/wjd.v8.i11.464.
  3. Lupoli R, Lembo E, Saldalamacchia G, Avola CK, Angrisani L, Capaldo B. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues. World J Diabetes. 2017 Nov 15;8(11):464-474. doi: 10.4239/wjd.v8.i11.464.
  4. Depeint F, Bruce WR, Shangari N, Mehta R, O’Brien PJ. Mitochondrial function and toxicity: role of the B vitamin family on mitochondrial energy metabolism. Chem Biol Interact. 2006 Oct 27;163(1-2):94-112. PMID: 16765926.
  5. Head K, Kelly G. Nutrients and botanicals for treatment of stress: adrenal fatigue, neurotransmitter imbalance, anxiety, and restless sleep. Alt Med Rev. 2009;14(2):114-140. PMID: 19594222
  6. Lupoli R, Lembo E, Saldalamacchia G, Avola CK, Angrisani L, Capaldo B. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues. World J Diabetes. 2017 Nov 15;8(11):464-474. doi: 10.4239/wjd.v8.i11.464.v
  7. Lupoli R, Lembo E, Saldalamacchia G, Avola CK, Angrisani L, Capaldo B. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues. World J Diabetes. 2017 Nov 15;8(11):464-474. doi: 10.4239/wjd.v8.i11.464.
  8. Lupoli R, Lembo E, Saldalamacchia G, Avola CK, Angrisani L, Capaldo B. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues. World J Diabetes. 2017 Nov 15;8(11):464-474. doi: 10.4239/wjd.v8.i11.464.
  9. Roy S, Sherman A, Monari-Sparks MJ, Schweiker O, Hunter K. Correction of low vitamin D improves fatigue: effect of correction of low vitamin F in fatigue study (EViDiF Study). N Am J Med Sci. 2014 Aug;6(8):396-402. doi:10.4103/1947-2714.139291.
  10. Miñambres I, Chico A, Pérez A. Severe hypocalcemia due to vitamin d deficiency after extended roux-en-y gastric bypass. J Obes. 2011;2011:141024. doi:10.1155/2011/141024.
  11. Rosanoff A, Dai Q, Shapses SA. Essential nutrient interactions: does low or suboptimal magnesium status interact with vitamin d and/or calcium status? Adv Nutr. 2016 Jan 15;7(1):25-43. doi: 10.3945/an.115.008631.
Five Fatigue-Fighting Nutrients for Life After Surgery